All news by: David Holland

Removal of Special Purpose Financial Statements – Does it impact you?

The AASB has issued ED 297 Removal of Special Purpose Financial Statements for Certain For-Profit Private Sector Entities.  ED 297, if approved, will remove the ability of for-profit large proprietary, unlisted public (other than companies limited by guarantee) and small foreign-controlled companies to lodge special purpose financial statements (SPFS) with ASIC (i.e. directors can no longer self-assess that they are a non-reporting entity).  Current estimates from the AASB predict 7,295 companies will be impacted by these changes.

Disclosures Required Under RDR Are Set to Tumble

ED 295 General Purpose Financial Statements – Simplified Disclosures for For-Profit and Not-for-Profit Tier 2 Entities proposes to replace the current Reduced Disclosure Requirements (RDR) framework with a Simplified Disclosure Standard. All entities currently using the RDR framework will fall into this new regime. It is important to note the proposals in ED 295 are closely linked to those expected in the forthcoming Exposure Draft on the proposed removal of special purpose financial statements (SPFS).

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AASB 9 and the Expected Credit Loss Model

AASB 9 introduces a significant change in the way impairment is calculated and recognised compared to previous requirements.  This has created confusion as to how to apply these requirements to financial assets of organisations.  This article provides practical guidance for entities struggling to apply the new requirements.

Should Loans be Classified as Current or Non-Current?

Issue

Loans that are in breach of covenants often pose difficult accounting considerations as to whether they should be classified as either current or non-current in the Statement of Financial Position.
This publication will highlight the key factors you should consider when deciding whether a loan should be classified as either current or non-current.
 

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the aged care sector?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15[1] Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2018 for for-profit entities and 1 January 2019 for not-for-profit entities in Australia.  During December 2016 the Australian Accounting Standards Board also released AASB 1058 Income of not-for-profit Entities effective for the same date as IFRS 15.  There has been considerable debate as to how these two new accounting standards interact with each other and also the likely impacts. 

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the property development and construction industry?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2018. Since IFRS 15 replaces all of the existing guidance on revenue recognition, and applies to all entities and industries, there has been considerable confusion (and debate) as to what the likely impacts are going to be, across different industries, when adopted.

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the property development and construction industry?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2018. Since IFRS 15 replaces all of the existing guidance on revenue recognition, and applies to all entities and industries, there has been considerable confusion (and debate) as to what the likely impacts are going to be, across different industries, when adopted.

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the not-for-profit sector?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2019 for not-for-profit entities in Australia. During December 2016 the Australian Accounting Standards Board also released AASB 1058 Income of not-for-profit Entities effective for the same date as IFRS 15. There has been considerable debate as to how these two new accounting standards interact with each other and also the likely impacts. 

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the mining industry?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2018. Since IFRS 15 replaces all of the existing guidance on revenue recognition, and applies to all entities and industries, there has been considerable confusion (and debate) as to what the likely impacts are going to be, across different industries, when adopted. 

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the Local Government sector?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2019 for not-for-profit entities in Australia. During December 2016 the Australian Accounting Standards Board also released AASB 1058 Income of Not-for-profit Entities effective for the same date as IFRS 15. There has been considerable debate as to how these two new accounting standards interact with each other and also the likely impacts.

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers impact the software industry?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 1 Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2018.  Since IFRS 15 replaces all the existing guidance on revenue recognition and applies to all entities and industries, there has been considerable confusion (and debate) as to what the likely impacts are going to be across different industries when adopted. 

Simplifying income recognition for not-for-profit-entities

On the 28th September 2016 the AASB issued new income recognition requirements for not-for-profit (NFP) entities:

  • AASB 10XX Income of Not-for-profit Entities; and
  • AASB 2016-X Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities.

AASB 2016-X will provide NFPs with guidance on how best to apply AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.  These draft standards are now available for comment as a ‘fatal flaw’ draft until 21 October 2016.

How will IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers affect you?

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) published IFRS 15[1] Revenue from Contracts with Customers in May 2014 effective for reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2018.  During the development of IFRS 15 the construction and property industry was identified as one of those most likely to be impacted upon by the new standard[2].  Given the long term nature of contracts within the construction and property industry it is vital that you understand and prepare for the impacts of IFRS 15 now.

IFRS 16 Leases - What does it mean for you?

Last week the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) issued IFRS 16 on Leases. The changes introduced by this standard is likely to increase both assets and liabilities on your balance sheet and you will need to consider the possible impact on any bank covenants such as Debt/Equity ratios. At Moore Stephens, our expert advisors are well equipped to assist you in applying this revised standard. For more information on the change, read the article below and contact us today.